Student Fellowships

 

ISE Darrell Posey Student Fellowships support highly promising PhD and Masters students from a wide range of geographical backgrounds, academic disciplines and ethnicities whose work shows great promise for ethnoecology and traditional resource rights, or more generally, for bridging academic research with applied community-based work. Preference is given to developing country students based in home country institutions and to Indigenous students in all countries. The Student Fellowships are intended to support elements of the research cycle that are integral to the ISE Code of Ethics and to making ethnoecological research directly relevant to the needs and rights of local communities. These activities are often not supported by funders, or encouraged by academic institutions. In the past students have used the Fellowships to carry out advanced consultations with communities in order to ensure their research is designed to serve problems identified by local groups; or to return their research results to communities in relevant formats such as manuals, videos, radio broadcasts and others.   PhD Fellows receive $4,000 annually for two years, plus additional funds for them to participate in an ISE Congress, Masters Fellow receive a one-time grant of $3,000, plus additional funds for them to participate in an ISE Congress. 

Juan Huilipan, a lonko (chief) of a Mapuche community, gathers the seeds of the pehuen (monkey puzzle tree) in the high Andes of southern Chile. Restricted access to these particular forests is endangering the continuity of such culturally important practices. Antonia Barreau (Darrell Posey Student Fellow 2014) has been working to support Mapuche revitalization of traditional food systems and access rights (Photo: Antonia Barreau 2013)

Juan Huilipan, a lonko (chief) of a Mapuche community, gathers the seeds of the pehuen (monkey puzzle tree) in the high Andes of southern Chile. Restricted access to these particular forests is endangering the continuity of such culturally important practices. Antonia Barreau (Darrell Posey Student Fellow 2014) has been working to support Mapuche revitalization of traditional food systems and access rights (Photo: Antonia Barreau 2013)


Janelle Baker (Photo: Cheebomosis, 2010)

Janelle Baker (Photo: Cheebomosis, 2010)

JANELLE MARIE BAKER

(CANADA, 2014-2015, PhD)

Janelle is learning from and working with three Cree/Dene First Nations in the oil sands region of northern Alberta, Canada. Her PhD research, based at McGill University, responds to the Federal Government’s legal “duty to consult” on the impact of natural resource extraction (largely oil and gas) on harvesting rights in traditional territories, where a resounding concern voiced by local people is the contamination of wild food. Janelle’s research investigates how the First Nations’ traditional ecological knowledge and ethnoecological worldview inform the concept of contamination.

Click here to watch a video of Janelle at the ISE Congress in Bhutan in 2014.


Thiago Gomes (Photo: Ana Góis, 2013)

Thiago Gomes (Photo: Ana Góis, 2013)

THIAGO C GOMES

(BRAZIL, 2014-2015, PhD)

Thiago’s PhD research at the Federal University of Santa Catarina in Brazil, investigates the social and ecological processes and patterns through which biodiversity has been maintained within the cultural landscapes of the Laklãnõ (Xokleng) Indigenous Territory in Brazil. He also intends to raise awareness, both inside and outside of the reserve, of how traditional forest resource management can be used as an important strategy for the restoration and conservation of forest ecosystems.

Click here to watch a video of Thiagoat the ISE Congress in Bhutan in 2014


Joaquin Carrizosa (Photo: Elena Norojo, 2014)

Joaquin Carrizosa (Photo: Elena Norojo, 2014)

JOAQUÍN CARRIZOSA

(COLOMBIA, 2012-2013, PhD)

Joaquín’s PhD research focuses on indigenous territoriality as an ongoing social and political process, and is the product of the many years that he spent living with the A’I Kofan Indigenous people in the Putumayo region of Colombia. The Fellowship enabled Joaquin to continue supporting several Indigenous groups in the region as they began to repair and rebuild their social and environmental fabric, following decades of war and the devastating effects of a 1960s oil boom, a 1990s coca boom, and the more recent widespread use of air-sprayed defoliants as part of a US-sponsored coca-eradication program. Based at both the Universidad Nacional de Colombia-Sede Leticia in Colombia and University of Kent in the UK, Joaquín has facilitated a series of strategic exchanges between groups attempting to re-establish their forest-based subsistence systems in order to reclaim their rights to their ancestral lands.


Gabrielle Legault (Photo: Jon Corbett, 2011)

Gabrielle Legault (Photo: Jon Corbett, 2011)

GABRIELLE LEGAULT

(CANADA, 2012-2013, PhD)

Gabrielle’s PhD research at the University of British Colombia, Canada, focuses on how Métis notions of identity and of their relationship to the land base have been formed amidst the historic processes of displacement, dispersion and urbanization to which these communities of mixed Aboriginal and European ancestry have been subjected. A Métis person herself, Gabrielle used the Fellowship to support discussions among the Métis and between Métis community groups and researchers in Kelowna, British Columbia. This work lays the foundations for a locally-driven research process that aims to explore and address a range of issues relating to Métis identity, territoriality, food harvesting, resource use and physical, mental and spiritual health.


Antonia Barreau (Photo: Inane Tekguc, 2012)

Antonia Barreau (Photo: Inane Tekguc, 2012)

Antonia Barreau Daly

(CHILE, 2014, MSc.)

Antonia’s research (University of British Columbia) looks at the relation between food sovereignty and accessibility to forests in Mapuche indigenous communities inhabiting temperate forests of southern Chile. Specifically, she will explore the interactions between wild edible plants and individuals (and landscape/community relationships as well), in order to understand and relate changes in traditional food systems with historical processes of landscape degradation, land grabbing and cultural homogenization.

Watch a video from Antonia in the field. English | Espanol


Brielle Beaudin

Brielle Beaudin

Brielle Beaudin

(CANADA, 2014, MSc.)

Brielle (University of Winnipeg), from a Métis background herself, is interested in studying traditional Métis food systems and their historical development, as well as contemporary Métis perspectives and knowledges on food systems. Her aim is to contribute to the development of a Metis‐specific indigenous food sovereignty framework that enhances the implementation of relevant food policies and practices in Manitoba, Canada.


DANIEL SALAU ROGEI

(KENYA, 2012, MSc.)

Daniel is a Maasai from the Great Rift Valley studying Communication Development at Daystar University, Kenya. For the past twelve years, he has worked with the Simba Maasai Outreach Organization, a community-based organization that he helped to found, which works to support the rights-based development of the Maasai through projects in the fields of education, environmental management and cultural and linguistic revival. As part of his Masters Daniel is using a broad range of media and participatory approaches to document and revitalize Maasai culture. Another aim is to establish the Centre for Indigenous Languages and Cultural Studies (CILACS), with its mission being to document and revitalize Maasai culture.


Leigh Joseph

(CANADA, 2012, MSc.) 

Leigh is a member of the Squamish First Nations and a Masters student in Ethnobotany (University of Victoria, Canada). For the past five years she has worked with several First Nations groups on ethnobotany-related projects. Her Masters research, which followed from speaking with community members interested in traditional plant foods and social renewal, is focused on the restoration of riceroot, an iconic traditional food plant. An important health-related context to her efforts in helping rebuild traditional diets relates to the ongoing diet-related epidemic of Type II diabetes and obesity among First Nations in the province.